© 2023 by Marketing Inc. Proudly created with Wix.com

         ABOUT TRANSCENDENCE   

Transcendence comes from the Latin prefix trans-, meaning "beyond," and the word scandare, meaning "to climb." When you achieve transcendence, you have gone beyond ordinary limitations. The word is often used to describe a spiritual or religious state, or a condition of moving beyond physical needs and realities. One way to achieve transcendence spiritually might be to fast for a long time. If you have trouble letting go of material needs, then you will have a difficult time achieving transcendence.

Transcendent or spiritual experiences point to a spirit or greater consciousness beyond the human, but not beyond nature. Rather, nature is in some sense spirit. God is 'all that there is'. Transcendent experience might connect you to a particular spirit within nature, or to the spirit or energy of nature itself.

In philosophy, transcendence conveys the basic ground concept from the word's literal meaning, of climbing or going beyond, all be it with varying connotations in its different historical and cultural stages. It includes philosophies, systems, and approaches that describe the fundamental structures of being, not as an ontology, but as the framework of emergence and validation of knowledge of being. "Transcendental" is a word derived from the scholastic, designating the extra-categorical attributes of beings

In religion, transcendence refers to the aspect of a deity's nature and power that is wholly independent of the material universe, beyond all known physical laws. This is contrasted with immanence, where a god is said to be fully present in the physical world and thus accessible to creatures in various ways. In religious experience transcendence is a state of being that has overcome the limitations of physical existence and by some definitions has also become independent of it. This is typically manifested in prayer, séance, meditation, psychedelics and paranormal "visions".  It is affirmed in various religious traditions' concept of the divine, which contrasts with the notion of a god (or, the Absolute) that exists exclusively in the physical order (immanentism), or indistinguishable from it (pantheism). Transcendence can be attributed to the divine not only in its being, but also in its knowledge. Thus, a god may transcend both the universe and knowledge (is beyond the grasp of the human mind).  Although transcendence is defined as the opposite of immanence, the two are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Some theologians and metaphysicians of various religious traditions affirm that a god is both within and beyond the universe (panentheism); in it, but not of it; simultaneously pervading it and surpassing it.

The Catholic Church, as do other Christian Churches, holds that God transcends all creation.  According to Aquinas, "...concerning God, we cannot grasp what he is, but only what he is not, and how other beings stand in relation to him.  Anthropomorphic depictions of God are largely metaphorical and reflect the challenge of "human modes of expression" in attempting to describe the infinite.  St. Augustine observed "...It is only by the use of such human expressions that Scripture can make its many kinds of readers whom it wants to help to feel, as it were, at home.  The "sense of transcendence" and therefore, an awareness of the "sacred", is an important component of the liturgy.  God is recognized as both transcendent and immanent.